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1 March 2008 The Effects of Stream Channelization and Restoration on Mammal Species and Habitat in Riparian Corridors
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Abstract

We investigated differences in habitat characteristics, mammal richness, and mammal activity among three stream types: channelized, unchannelized, and restored. Riparian plant species richness was significantly higher at the unchannelized stream than at the other two streams. The Kentucky Macroinvertebrate Bioassessment Index was highest at the unchannelized stream and much lower at the restored stream than the other two streams. Small mammal activity did not differ among stream types. Richness of terrestrial mammals, as determined by motion-sensitive cameras, did not differ significantly among streams. Track plot surveys showed, however, that unchannelized and restored streams had significantly higher terrestrial mammal species richness than the channelized stream. Likewise, track transect surveys conducted in snow, showed that species richness at the unchannelized stream was significantly higher than the channelized stream. There was some indication that bat activity was affected by an interaction between month and stream type. Results suggested that channelization and restoration affect habitat characteristics, mammal richness, and mammal activity; however, restored streams have potential to recover many of the characteristics of an unchannelized stream.

T Travis Brown, Terry L. Derting, and Kenneth Fairbanks "The Effects of Stream Channelization and Restoration on Mammal Species and Habitat in Riparian Corridors," Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 69(1), 37-49, (1 March 2008). https://doi.org/10.3101/1098-7096(2008)69[37:TEOSCA]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 March 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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