Translator Disclaimer
31 January 2019 Changes in Population Demography and Reproductive Output of the Invasive Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Asian Shore Crab) in the Long Island Sound from 2005 to 2017
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Cross-intertidal transects at a western Long Island Sound estuary site provided estimates of the density of the non-native Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Asian Shore Crab) from 1998 to 2017, and measurements of crab size (carapace width; CW) from 2005 to 2017. Since 2001, average intertidal density declined by ∼5% per year. This decline was driven by decreases in the density of larger crabs, with consequent reductions in average and maximum sizes of both males and females. The proportion of the largest crabs (>24 mm CW) dropped from 10.1% of the population in 2005 to 1.4% in 2017. Individual reproductive output scales with size; thus, I estimate the loss of the largest females to have reduced population reproductive output by half between 2005 and 2017. Also, the frequency of ovigerous females in the smallest reproductively mature classes (12–14 mm CW) increased. Though the density and average size of Asian Shore Crab have declined significantly, resident and native crab populations have still not recovered.

George P. Kraemer "Changes in Population Demography and Reproductive Output of the Invasive Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Asian Shore Crab) in the Long Island Sound from 2005 to 2017," Northeastern Naturalist 26(1), 81-94, (31 January 2019). https://doi.org/10.1656/045.026.0101
Published: 31 January 2019
JOURNAL ARTICLE
14 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top