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1 January 2012 The Effects of Increasing Grazing Height on Establishment of Pasture Weeds in Management-Intensive Rotationally Grazed Pastures
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Abstract

Weeds can infest management-intensive grazed pastures and impact forage quantity, forage quality, and animal health. Common burdock, plumeless thistle, and Canada thistle are three common pasture weeds in the midwestern United States that are managed to avoid these impacts. Experiments were established at two sites to determine if increasing grazing heights from fall through summer would reduce emergence and survival of burdock, plumeless thistle, and Canada thistle seedlings. Five simulated grazing heights (5, 10, 15, and 20 cm and a not-clipped treatment) were implemented in October 2008 and repeated in May through August. Density of all species was reduced from May to September, with reductions ranging from 65 to 78%, regardless of treatment. Treatments that left at least 15 cm of residual grass had reduced densities of burdock and Canada thistle compared to the 10-cm treatment. Regression analysis demonstrated that reduction in burdock and summed planted weed density was related to increased intercepted photosynthetically active radiation from forage in April. However, total biomass yield was reduced up to 60% when grazing heights were increased from 5 to 20 cm, although differences were only observed at the fall and early spring grazing events. Relative forage quality (RFQ) was similar across treatments, except at the third grazing event for which the 15 and 20-cm treatments had reduced RFQ compared with other treatments. Results suggest that increasing grazing heights can reduce emergence and survival of burdock and Canada thistle but can also result in a reduction in forage quantity in the fall and early spring.

Nomenclature: Canada thistle, Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop.; common burdock, Arctium minus Bernh.; plumeless thistle, Carduus acanthoides L.

Weed Science Society of America
MARK J. RENZ and Marie L. Schmidt "The Effects of Increasing Grazing Height on Establishment of Pasture Weeds in Management-Intensive Rotationally Grazed Pastures," Weed Science 60(1), 92-96, (1 January 2012). https://doi.org/10.1614/WS-D-11-00053.1
Received: 15 April 2011; Accepted: 1 August 2011; Published: 1 January 2012
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