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1 February 2012 Native Hawaiian Succineids Prefer Non-Native Ginger (Hedychium spp.) Plant Species in the Kohala Mountains, Hawaii: Conservation Ramifications
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Abstract

Although non-native species have been implicated as a major factor in the decline of the native Hawaiian land snail fauna, little attention has been focused on understanding how colonization by non-native plants influences Hawaiian land snail populations. The plant preferences of native Hawaiian succineids in the Kohala Forest Reserve were examined where native plant species and invasive non-native ginger species are present to understand how changes in the understory plant composition may influence succineid populations. Surprisingly, native succineid land snails preferred non-native ginger species to native plant species. This finding suggests that native succineid populations may not be negatively affected when the understory plant assemblage changes from a native plant community to one composed primarily of non-native ginger species. However, this preference also indicates that native succineids may be vulnerable to the effects of ginger control efforts. As such, managers should proceed cautiously with ginger removal efforts if they intend not to harm native succineid populations. Hopefully, future efforts to control non-native ginger species will adapt and minimize any negative effects on native succineid species.

Wallace M. Meyer "Native Hawaiian Succineids Prefer Non-Native Ginger (Hedychium spp.) Plant Species in the Kohala Mountains, Hawaii: Conservation Ramifications," American Malacological Bulletin 30(1), 147-151, (1 February 2012). https://doi.org/10.4003/006.030.0112
Received: 29 November 2010; Accepted: 1 July 2011; Published: 1 February 2012
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