Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2012 Behavioral Discrimination between Monogyne and Polygyne Red Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in their Native Range
Mónica G. Chirino, Lawrence E. Gilbert, Patricia J. Folgarait
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Nestmate recognition among social insects is presumed to restrict non-nestmates from exploiting nest resources. Here, we developed aggression bioassays to assess the discrimination behaviors of both polygynous and monogynous forms of the red fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, during symmetrical interactions in neutral arenas. Workers from polygyne colonies exhibited risk avoidance behaviors; that is, defensive postures or the avoidance of direct contact during interactions. Workers from monogyne colonies always exhibited aggressive behaviors in the form of physical or chemical attacks. In interactions between both, monogyne workers usually started the aggression by surrounding and biting the polygyne ants. Polygyne S. invicta workers also distinguished nestmates from foreigners, but their response was not as aggressive as that of monogynes. The proposed ethogram that we constructed identified monogyne and polygyne forms of S. invicta colonies in concordance with current measures, including number of queens, and expression of the Gp-9 gene.

© 2012 Entomological Society of America
Mónica G. Chirino, Lawrence E. Gilbert, and Patricia J. Folgarait "Behavioral Discrimination between Monogyne and Polygyne Red Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in their Native Range," Annals of the Entomological Society of America 105(5), 740-745, (1 September 2012). https://doi.org/10.1603/AN11073
Received: 20 April 2011; Accepted: 1 June 2012; Published: 1 September 2012
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top