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1 March 2006 Neonatal Osteomyelitis Associated with Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey Poults
Matilde Alfonso, H. John Barnes
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Abstract

A case of Staphylococcus aureus infection causing osteomyelitis in young turkey poults is described. Mortality during the first week after hatching was 12.6%. Poults showed leg weakness, inflammation of all four toes, swelling of feet and hock joints, and osteomyelitis of the proximal tibiotarsus. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from exudate in the hock joints and footpads. Granulocytic infiltration and colonies of gram-positive coccoid bacteria compatible with S. aureus were found on microscopic examination of the lesions. Toe trimming after hatching is believed to have provided a portal of entry for S. aureus, which resulted in infection of the toes and spread along tendons to joints and bones of the leg. Neonatal staphylococcal osteomyelitis should be considered when recently placed turkey flocks experience increased mortality, especially if they develop severe swelling and inflammation of toes following trimming and have enlarged swollen feet, tendons, or joints.

Matilde Alfonso and H. John Barnes "Neonatal Osteomyelitis Associated with Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey Poults," Avian Diseases 50(1), 148-151, (1 March 2006). https://doi.org/10.1637/7298-110104R.1
Received: 1 November 2004; Accepted: 1 September 2005; Published: 1 March 2006
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KEYWORDS
leg weakness
Neonatal
osteomyelitis
Staphylococcus aureus
toe trimming
turkey poults
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