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1 June 2011 Emergence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Potsdam as a Major Serovar in Waterfowl Hatcheries and Chicken Eggs
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Abstract

Salmonellosis is a common food-borne illness in humans caused by Salmonella-contaminated poultry and their products. In hatcheries, 110 Salmonella isolates were identified, mostly from first enrichment, and few from delayed enrichment. The Salmonella prevalence in goose and duck hatcheries was higher when measured by four multiplex PCR methods than by traditional culture (73.8% vs. 44.35%, P < 0.05); 97.3% of 110 isolates were Salmonella Potsdam of serogroup C1 and other isolates were Salmonella Montevideo of C1 and Salmonella Albany of C2. Plasmid and pulsed field gel electrophoresis genetic analysis revealed that isolates from duck hatcheries were more diverse than those from goose hatcheries. In Salmonella Potsdam, host species-specific genotypes were observed in geese for genotypes 3, 4, and 5 and in ducks for genotypes 7, 8, and 9, suggesting that Salmonella Potsdam may evolve into goose- and duck-specific isolates. An examination of 1121 eggs found that only Salmonella Potsdam was identified in 1.8% (7/591) of eggs from chickens fed on the ground, not housed in cages, and in egg content (6/7) as well as eggshell membrane (1/7). In conclusion, Salmonella Potsdam may be a major Salmonella infection in waterfowl and chicken eggs.

Yao-Chi Su, Chang-You Yu, Jiang-Liang Lin, Jyh-Mirn Lai, Shu-Wun Chen, Pei-Chun Tu, and Chishih Chu "Emergence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Potsdam as a Major Serovar in Waterfowl Hatcheries and Chicken Eggs," Avian Diseases 55(2), 217-222, (1 June 2011). https://doi.org/10.1637/9420-060910-Reg.1
Received: 19 June 2010; Accepted: 1 January 2011; Published: 1 June 2011
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