Translator Disclaimer
6 May 2013 Isolation of Influenza A Viruses from Wild Ducks and Feathers in Minnesota (2010–2011)
Camille Lebarbenchon, Rebecca Poulson, Kelly Shannon, Jeremiah Slagter, Morgan J. Slusher, Benjamin R. Wilcox, James Berdeen, Gregory A. Knutsen, Carol J. Cardona, David E. Stallknecht
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

We investigated the feasibility of testing feathers as a complementary approach to detect low pathogenic influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild duck populations. Feathers on the ground were collected at four duck capture sites during 2010 and 2011, in Minnesota, U. S. A. IAVs were isolated from both feathers and cloacal swabs sampled from ducks at the time of capture. Although virus isolation rates from feather and cloacal swabs were inconsistent between collections, the overall rate of isolation was greatest from the feather samples. Viruses isolated from feathers also reflected the subtype diversity observed in cloacal swab isolates but resulted in many more isolates that contained more than one virus. Our study suggests that testing feathers may represent an alternative noninvasive approach to recover viruses and estimate subtype abundance and diversity.

Nota de Investigación—Aislamiento del virus de la influenza aviar de patos silvestres y de plumas en Minnesota (2010–2011).

Se investigó la viabilidad de analizar las plumas como un enfoque complementario para detectar al virus de influenza aviar tipo A de baja patogenicidad (IAV) en poblaciones de patos silvestres. Se recolectaron plumas del suelo de cuatro sitios de captura de patos durante los años 2010 y 2011, en Minnesota, en los Estados Unidos. Los virus de influenza aviar de baja patogenicidad fueron aislados de las plumas y de los hisopos cloacales recolectados de los patos en el momento de la captura. Aunque los porcentajes de aislamiento del virus de las plumas y de los hisopos cloacales fueron inconsistentes entre las recolecciones, la tasa global de aislamiento era mayor en las muestras de plumas. Los virus aislados a partir de las plumas también reflejaron la diversidad de subtipos observados en los aislados de hisopos cloacales pero resultaron en muchos más aislamientos que contenían más de un virus. Nuestro estudio sugiere que el análisis de las plumas puede representar un enfoque alternativo no invasivo para recuperar los virus y estimar la abundancia de subtipos y su diversidad.

American Association of Avian Pathologists
Camille Lebarbenchon, Rebecca Poulson, Kelly Shannon, Jeremiah Slagter, Morgan J. Slusher, Benjamin R. Wilcox, James Berdeen, Gregory A. Knutsen, Carol J. Cardona, and David E. Stallknecht "Isolation of Influenza A Viruses from Wild Ducks and Feathers in Minnesota (2010–2011)," Avian Diseases 57(3), 677-680, (6 May 2013). https://doi.org/10.1637/10455-112512-ResNote.1
Received: 26 November 2012; Accepted: 1 May 2013; Published: 6 May 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


Share
SHARE
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top