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1 March 2004 Paternally Transmitted Chromosomal Aberrations in Mouse Zygotes Determine Their Embryonic Fate
Francesco Marchetti, Jack B. Bishop, Lidia Cosentino, Dan Moore, Andrew J. Wyrobek
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Abstract

The developmental consequences of chromosomal aberrations in embryos include spontaneous abortions, morphological defects, inborn abnormalities, and genetic/chromosomal diseases. Six germ-cell mutagens with different modes of action and spermatogenic stage sensitivities were used to investigate the relationship between the types of cytogenetic damage in zygotes with their subsequent risk of postimplantation death and of birth as a translocation carrier. Independent of the mutagen used, over 98% of paternally transmitted aberrations were chromosome type, rather than chromatid type, indicating that they were formed during the period between exposure of male germ cells and initiation of the first S phase after fertilization. There were consistent one-to-one agreements between the proportions of a) zygotes with unstable aberrations and the frequencies of dead embryos after implantation (slope = 0.87, confidence interval [CI]: 0.74, 1.16) and b) zygotes with reciprocal translocations and the frequency of translocation carriers at birth (slope = 0.74, CI: 0.48, 2.11). These findings suggest that chromosomal aberrations in zygotes are highly predictive of subsequent abnormal embryonic development and that development appears to proceed to implantation regardless of the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. Our findings support the hypothesis that, for paternally transmitted chromosomal aberrations, the fate of the embryo is already set by the end of G1 of the first cell cycle of development.

Francesco Marchetti, Jack B. Bishop, Lidia Cosentino, Dan Moore, and Andrew J. Wyrobek "Paternally Transmitted Chromosomal Aberrations in Mouse Zygotes Determine Their Embryonic Fate," Biology of Reproduction 70(3), 616-624, (1 March 2004). https://doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.103.023044
Received: 9 September 2003; Accepted: 1 October 2003; Published: 1 March 2004
KEYWORDS
developmental biology
embryo
fertilization
sperm
toxicology
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