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25 March 2020 Red blood cells are superior to plasma for predicting subcutaneous trans fatty acid composition in beef heifers
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Abstract

The trans (t)-18:1 content in beef has become more of interest as partially hydrogenated vegetable oils are removed from foods. Predicting t-18:1 early in the feeding period would be useful if limitations are put on t-18:1 in beef. To determine which blood component is better related to backfat, proportions of t10-18:1 and t11-18:1 (vaccenic acid) were measured in heifer red blood cells (RBC) and plasma (N = 14) after 0, 28, 56, and 76 d on a barley-grain-based diet, and correlated with post-slaughter subcutaneous fat (SCF). Total t-18:1 declined in both RBC and plasma during late finishing (P < 0.05). At 28 d, t11-18:1 decreased and t10-18:1 increased in RBC and plasma (P < 0.05). By 76 d, t10-18:1 declined to 0 d levels. RBC and plasma t-18:1 compositions were highly correlated (t10-18:1, r ≥ 0.7, P ≤ 0.02; t11-18:1, r ≥ 0.51, P ≤ 0.06). Correlations with post-slaughter backfat were, however, consistently greater for RBC compared with plasma. The use of RBC t-18:1 composition may, therefore, be superior to plasma for predicting t-18:1 in SCF, and the length of finishing could be useful for manipulating t-18:1 in beef. The time required for changes in t18:1 in RBC to reflect in changes in SCF still, however, needs to be determined to establish optimal durations for beneficial modification.

© Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada 2020. Permission for reuse (free in most cases) can be obtained from copyright.com.
P. Vahmani, D.C. Rolland, H.C. Block, and M.E.R. Dugan "Red blood cells are superior to plasma for predicting subcutaneous trans fatty acid composition in beef heifers," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 100(3), 570-576, (25 March 2020). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjas-2019-0164
Received: 9 September 2019; Accepted: 6 March 2020; Published: 25 March 2020
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