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21 August 2014 Differences between reproductive traits in beef bulls used for multiple-sire breeding under range conditions
C. C. Brauner, L. M. Menezes, J. S. Lemes, M. A. Pimentel
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Abstract

Brauner, C. C., Menezes, L. M., Lemes, J. S. and Pimentel, M. A. 2014. Differences between reproductive traits in beef bulls used for multiple-sire breeding under range conditions. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 94: 647-652. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproductive traits (scrotal circumference and semen quality) of different breeds of beef bulls used for multiple-sire breeding under range conditions, as well as to verify the relation between four sperm concentration scores and the reproductive traits of beef bulls. Two hundred and one bulls of three different breeds (Angus, Nelore and Brangus) and three different age groups (18, 24 and 36 mo old) were evaluated. Angus showed better (P>0.05) reproductive traits than Brangus and Nelore bulls, in which scrotal circumference, mass motility spermatozoa, motility spermatozoa, as well as spermatic vigor were greater than those of other breeds. Two-year-old bulls demonstrated better reproductive traits as compared with the other age groups. The sperm concentration score had a linear effect (P<0.01) on all reproductive traits evaluated, and the same evidence was also detected for body weight. It was concluded that genetic groups should be considered differently for multiple-sire breeding under range conditions, especially because Bos taurus and Bos indicus have significant reproductive trait differences. Moreover, the sperm concentration score can be used as an auxiliary method of semen quality in beef bulls, having a positive relation with other breeding soundness evaluation traits.

C. C. Brauner, L. M. Menezes, J. S. Lemes, and M. A. Pimentel "Differences between reproductive traits in beef bulls used for multiple-sire breeding under range conditions," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 94(4), 647-652, (21 August 2014). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJAS-2014-011
Received: 17 January 2014; Accepted: 1 August 2014; Published: 21 August 2014
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