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1 February 2000 Responses of Female Oriental Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Protein and Host Fruit Odors in Field Cage and Open Field Tests
Mary L. Cornelius, Laurent Nergel, Jian J. Duan, Russell H. Messing
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Abstract

The attraction of female oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), to protein and host fruit odors was examined in field-cage and field experiments. In field-cage experiments, we examined how the physiological state of laboratory-cultured female oriental fruit flies affected their responses to protein (Nu-Lure) and fruit (orange) odors. Both mated and unmated, protein-fed females (10–12 d old) were more attracted to fruit odors than to protein odors, whereas mated, protein-deprived females (10–12 d old) and unmated, protein-fed females (2–3 d old) were equally attracted to fruit and protein odors. The combination of fruit and protein odors was less attractive to protein-fed females than fruit odors alone. Field tests were conducted to compare capture rates of wild oriental fruit flies in traps baited with commercially available protein baits, Nu-Lure, Trécé A.M. Supercharger, and BioLure, and in traps baited with either fruit (orange) or Nu-Lure in a commercial guava orchard. Spheres baited with either Supercharger or BioLure captured more female oriental fruit flies than unbaited spheres when the lures were hung above spheres. Traps baited with Nu-Lure were more effective for capturing females than traps baited with orange puree in field tests.

Mary L. Cornelius, Laurent Nergel, Jian J. Duan, and Russell H. Messing "Responses of Female Oriental Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Protein and Host Fruit Odors in Field Cage and Open Field Tests," Environmental Entomology 29(1), 14-19, (1 February 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X-29.1.14
Received: 13 July 1999; Accepted: 1 November 1999; Published: 1 February 2000
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