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1 May 2001 CHILL-COMA TOLERANCE, A MAJOR CLIMATIC ADAPTATION AMONG DROSOPHILA SPECIES
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Abstract

Most drosophilid species can be classified either as temperate or tropical. Adults of species were submitted to a cold treatment (0°C) and then brought back to ambient temperature. They generally exhibited a chill coma and the time needed to recover was measured. We found in a set of 26 temperate species that recovery was rapid (average 1.8 min, range 0.15–4.9). In contrast, a long recovery time (average 56 min, range 24–120) was observed for 48 tropical species. A few species, like Drosophila melanogaster, are cosmopolitan and can proliferate under temperate and tropical climates. In 9 of 10 such species, slight genetic differences were found: a shorter recovery in temperate than in tropical populations. Comparing physiological data to phylogeny suggests that chill-coma tolerance has been a recurrent adaptation that is selected for in cold climates but tends to disappear under a permanently warm environment. This major climatic adaptation, evidenced in drosophilids, seems to occur in other insect groups also.

Corresponding Editor: T. Mousseau

Patricia Gibert, Brigitte Moreteau, Georges Pétavy, Dev Karan, and Jean R. David "CHILL-COMA TOLERANCE, A MAJOR CLIMATIC ADAPTATION AMONG DROSOPHILA SPECIES," Evolution 55(5), 1063-1068, (1 May 2001). https://doi.org/10.1554/0014-3820(2001)055[1063:CCTAMC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 14 August 2000; Accepted: 1 December 2000; Published: 1 May 2001
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