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1 October 2008 Kin Selection, Local Competition, and Reproductive Skew
Rufus A. Johnstone
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Abstract

In a spatially structured population, limited dispersal gives rise to local relatedness, potentially favoring indiscriminate helping behavior. However, it also leads to local competition, which reduces the benefits of helping local kin. This tension has become the focus for a growing body of theoretical work. Existing models, however, have focused chiefly on the net impact of limited dispersal on cooperative or competitive effort in a homogeneous population. Here, I extend existing models of kin selection in a group-structured population to allow for asymmetries in expected fecundity and reproductive success among group members. I explore the consequent impact of limited dispersal on the evolution of helping and harming behavior, and on the degree of reproductive inequality or skew. I show that when individuals in a group differ in their expected fecundity, limited dispersal gives rise to kin selection for harming behavior on the part of more fecund individuals, and for helping behavior on the part of less fecund individuals. As a result, philopatry tends to exaggerate differences in reproductive success, and so promotes greater reproductive skew.

Rufus A. Johnstone "Kin Selection, Local Competition, and Reproductive Skew," Evolution 62(10), 2592-2599, (1 October 2008). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00480.x
Received: 29 May 2008; Accepted: 16 July 2008; Published: 1 October 2008
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KEYWORDS
COOPERATION
Helping
limited dispersal
tug-of-war
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