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1 September 2015 Thromboelastography Values in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots ( Amazona ventralis): A Pilot Study
Krista A. Keller, David Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, Mark J. Acierno, Hugues Beaufrère, Kristin M. Sinclair, Sean D. Owens, Joanne Paul-Murphy, Thomas N. Tully
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Abstract

Thromboelastography (TEG) provides a global assessment of coagulation, including the rate of clot initiation, clot kinetics, achievement of maximum clot strength, and fibrinolysis. Thromboelastography (TEG) is used with increasing frequency in the field of veterinary medicine, although its usefulness in avian species has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the applicability of TEG in psittacine birds. Kaolin-activated TEG was used to analyze citrated whole blood collected routinely from 8 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). The minimum and maximum TEG values obtained included time to clot initiation (2.6–15 minutes), clot formation time (4.3–20.8 minutes), α angle (12.7°–47.9°), maximum amplitude of clot strength (26.3–46.2 mm), and percentage of lysis 30 minutes after achievement of maximum amplitude (0%–5.3%). The TEG values demonstrated comparative hypocoagulability relative to published values in canine and feline species. Differences may be explained by either the in vitro temperature at which TEG is standardly performed or the method of activation used in this study. Although TEG may have significant advantages over traditional coagulation tests, including lack of need for species-specific reagents, further evaluation is required in a variety of avian species and while exploring various TEG methodologies before this technology can be recommended for use in clinical cases.

Krista A. Keller, David Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, Mark J. Acierno, Hugues Beaufrère, Kristin M. Sinclair, Sean D. Owens, Joanne Paul-Murphy, and Thomas N. Tully "Thromboelastography Values in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots ( Amazona ventralis): A Pilot Study," Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery 29(3), 174-180, (1 September 2015). https://doi.org/10.1647/2014-018
Published: 1 September 2015
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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