Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2018 A Retrospective Study of Horner Syndrome in Australian Wild Birds, 2010–2016
Andrew G. Hill
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Horner syndrome was identified in 25 of 30 777 avian admissions to Currumbin Wildlife Hospital during 2010–2016. Unilateral ptosis and erection of facial feathers were distinct findings on physical examination and consistent across 9 species. Affected birds were biased toward adults (64%) suffering traumatic injuries (88%). Concurrent injuries requiring treatment were present in 38% of cases, and 76% had additional neurologic deficits. Prognosis for release was poor, with an overall success rate of 32%. Resolution of clinical signs increased to 44% with higher doses of meloxicam and required an average hospitalization of 22 days (range, 3–78 days). Further investigation of the underlying causes of Horner syndrome in birds to provide treatment and prognostic guidelines is warranted.

© 2018 by the Association of Avian Veterinarians
Andrew G. Hill "A Retrospective Study of Horner Syndrome in Australian Wild Birds, 2010–2016," Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery 32(2), 115-121, (1 June 2018). https://doi.org/10.1647/2017-256
Published: 1 June 2018
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES


Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
Avian
Bird
Horner syndrome
ptosis
sympathetic nervous system
trauma
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top