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1 November 2007 Elevated Waves Erode the Western End of the Recently Completed Sand Berm on Dauphin Island, Alabama (U.S.A)
Carl R. Froede Jr.
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Abstract

Dauphin island is a microtidal barrier island located approximately 8.0 km offshore from southwestern Alabama (U.S.A.). Morphological changes to the island, brought about by passing tropical storms and hurricanes, have been noted since it was first settled in 1699. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina (a Category 3 hurricane) made landfall approximately 117 km west of Dauphin Island. Despite the extended distance, the storm impacted the island with waves that completely overwashed and flattened most of the western low-lying areas. The hurricane also segmented Dauphin Island into two distinct barrier islands, the undeveloped Dauphin Island West, and the residentially developed Dauphin Island East. Immediately following the storm, the Town of Dauphin Island recognized the need to take action to protect low-lying residential property on the western segment of Dauphin Island East. Sand berm construction began on January 29, 2007. The 6.4-km-long berm is to provide sufficient time to allow the Town of Dauphin Island to identify and possibly implement a more permanent solution to storm erosion along the low-lying western residential portion of the island before the sand wall will be lost. However, the western end of the sand berm experienced significant erosion due to elevated tides before construction was completed in May 2007. Several segments of the sand berm within this area have been completely lost while other sections are experiencing ongoing erosion. Under these conditions, the Town of Dauphin Island does not have much time to identify and implement one or more long-term solutions to beach erosion and property loss for the western segment of Dauphin Island East.

Carl R. Froede Jr. "Elevated Waves Erode the Western End of the Recently Completed Sand Berm on Dauphin Island, Alabama (U.S.A)," Journal of Coastal Research 2007(236), 1602-1604, (1 November 2007). https://doi.org/10.2112/07A-0019.1
Received: 6 August 2007; Accepted: 1 August 2007; Published: 1 November 2007
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