Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2000 Grape Cane Gallmaker (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and its Impact on Cultivated Grapes
Michael C. Saunders, Patrick C. Tobin
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The grape cane gallmaker, Ampeloglypter sesostris (Leconte), is a native weevil that infests new shoots of wild and cultivated grapes (Vitis spp.). Females oviposit on the tender portions of new shoots, producing a reddish gall that can expand the shoot to twice its normal diameter. These galls can be quite numerous in eastern vineyards, and their effects are unknown. We studied the spatial distribution of grape cane gallmaker and its impact on berry size, sugar content, and nutrient and mineral uptake. We observed spatial trends in grape cane gallmaker distribution in vineyards adjacent to woodland margins, with the trend emanating from the woodline. In vineyards without woodland margins, there was little spatial dependency in grape cane gallmaker distribution in individual years. However, grape cane gallmaker density on a single vine was spatially cross-correlated between 2 yr. The presence of galls did not significantly affect berry quality, or the uptake of nutrients and minerals, and we conclude that grape cane gallmaker does not negatively impact berry quality or mature vine vigor.

Michael C. Saunders and Patrick C. Tobin "Grape Cane Gallmaker (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and its Impact on Cultivated Grapes," Journal of Economic Entomology 93(3), 795-799, (1 June 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-93.3.795
Received: 29 September 1999; Accepted: 1 February 2000; Published: 1 June 2000
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top