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1 March 2005 Indigenous Snake Bite Remedies of the Luo of Western Kenya
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Abstract

Medicinal plants have been overtaken in the treatment of snake bites by serum therapy and are rarely considered efficacious remedies in biomedicine. Nevertheless, rural inhabitants rely on plant medical material and the attention of highly regarded local traditional healers when threatened by snakebite poisoning. This paper examines curative and preventive snakebite treatments, beliefs and practices collected from 100 Luo respondents. The informants reported the use of a number of herbal and non-herbal remedies including mystical therapies and 24 herbaceous plants whose aerial parts are preferred. Treatments involve cut, suck, and bind methods followed by application of plant leaf and root poultices held in place with strips of cloth or bark.

Bethwell O. Owuor, Benson A. Mulemi, and John O. Kokwaro "Indigenous Snake Bite Remedies of the Luo of Western Kenya," Journal of Ethnobiology 25(1), 129-141, (1 March 2005). https://doi.org/10.2993/0278-0771(2005)25[129:ISBROT]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 March 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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