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1 July 2004 Relative Abundance of Two Cuticular Hydrocarbons Indicates Whether a Mosquito Is Old Enough to Transmit Malaria Parasites
Brandon Brei, John D. Edman, Ben Gerade, J. Marshall Clark
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Abstract

Temporal changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of female Anopheles stephensi (Liston) (Diptera: Culicidae) were quantified using gas-liquid chromatography with flame-ionization detection. The ratio of two prominent hydrocarbons, nonacosane (C29) and hentriacontane (C31), was found to change significantly with respect to mosquito age over a period of 15 d. A regression model was developed using this ratio, C29/C31 = 3.96 − 1.63 log (age), and prediction intervals, based on a 12-d developmental interval necessary for females to transmit malaria, were generated using confidence levels for one-sided tests. The model predicted that females that had a C29/C31 ratio of 2.6 or greater were only 10% probable to be old enough to transmit malaria, whereas females with ratios of 1.8 or less were 90% probable.

Brandon Brei, John D. Edman, Ben Gerade, and J. Marshall Clark "Relative Abundance of Two Cuticular Hydrocarbons Indicates Whether a Mosquito Is Old Enough to Transmit Malaria Parasites," Journal of Medical Entomology 41(4), 807-809, (1 July 2004). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585-41.4.807
Received: 1 August 2003; Accepted: 1 March 2004; Published: 1 July 2004
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