How to translate text using browser tools
4 November 2020 Synanthropy of Sarcophaginae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) From Southern Brazil and Its Sanitary Implications
Carina M. Souza, Tais Madeira-Ott, Franciele S. Masiero, Paulo R. S. Bunde, Gladis A. Ribeiro, Patricia J. Thyssen
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Although different feeding habits have been reported for Sarcophaginae (Diptera, Sarcophagidae), most species are associated with decomposing organic matter such as feces and decaying corpses. This study provides the synanthropy index for males of species of Sarcophaginae collected during a 12-mo period in three different environments (urban, rural, and wild) of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in Southern Brazil, linking this parameter with the sanitary issue. This article also investigated the presence of pathogenic bacteria on the external surface of Oxysarcodexia paulistanensis (Mattos), the most abundant species collected using a sanitized entomological net. Almost all the species collected most abundantly, including O. paulistanensis (n = 241), Ravinia advena (Walker) (n = 87), and O. thornax (Walker) (n = 58), were classified as synanthropic; O. thornax was the species with the highest synanthropy index (+80.3). Escherichia coli (Escherich), Shigella spp. (Enterobacteriaceae), and Staphylococcus aureus (Rosenbach) (Staphylococcaceae) were isolated and identified from the external surface of O. paulistanensis. The isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria, and their synanthropic behavior, adds weight to potential role of some flesh flies, as O. paulistanensis, in a sanitary context.

© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Carina M. Souza, Tais Madeira-Ott, Franciele S. Masiero, Paulo R. S. Bunde, Gladis A. Ribeiro, and Patricia J. Thyssen "Synanthropy of Sarcophaginae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) From Southern Brazil and Its Sanitary Implications," Journal of Medical Entomology 58(2), 913-920, (4 November 2020). https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjaa243
Received: 7 August 2020; Accepted: 27 September 2020; Published: 4 November 2020
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

KEYWORDS
enterobacteria
flesh fly
medical and veterinary entomology
pathogen
vector
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top