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21 April 2023 Exploring the effects of caffeine on Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) survival and fecundity
Haley A. Abernathy, Ross M. Boyce, Michael H. Reiskind
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Abstract

Investigating new avenues of mosquito control is an important area of entomological research. Examining the effects of various compounds on mosquito biology contributes to the foundation of knowledge from which novel control methods can be built. Caffeine, in particular, is a commonly consumed compound that has not been thoroughly studied for its potential in disrupting the natural life cycle of mosquitoes. In this exploratory study, we analyzed caffeine's effect on the blood-feeding behavior, survival, and fecundity of Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.Two outcomes, blood-feeding behavior and fecundity, were analyzed in the first experiment in which mosquitoes were exposed to caffeine doses ranging from 0.2 to 2.4 mg/ml. We found a negative linear relationship between dose and fecundity, but no significant impact on blood-feeding behavior. Adjustments were made to the experimental design in which mosquitoes were exposed to doses ranging from 2.5 to 20 mg/ml. From this experiment, we found that caffeine negatively affected blood-feeding behavior, survival, and fecundity especially at higher concentrations.These results suggest that caffeine could be a potential target for future mosquito control research.

Haley A. Abernathy, Ross M. Boyce, and Michael H. Reiskind "Exploring the effects of caffeine on Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) survival and fecundity," Journal of Medical Entomology 60(4), 837-841, (21 April 2023). https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjad047
Received: 8 January 2023; Accepted: 12 April 2023; Published: 21 April 2023
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KEYWORDS
Aedes albopictus
caffeine
coffee
fecundity
survival
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