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1 March 2009 Laboratory and Field Investigations of Pestiferous Chironomidae (Diptera) in Some Man-Made Wetlands in Central Florida, USA
Arshad Ali, Robert J. Leckel, Nusrad Jahan, Salman A. Al-Shami, Che Salmah MD. Rawi
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Abstract

A 1-year larval and adult population survey of pestiferous chironomids was conducted in 4 man-made wetlands in a resort area of central Florida, USA. Benthic samples were randomly collected from each wetland at least once every month. Geocoordinates, water depth, and physical composition of substrates at each larval sample location were noted. Adult midge populations were sampled weekly around the wetlands by employing 10 New Jersey light traps permanently placed in the area. Chironominae and Tanypodinae midges occurred in the larval and adult samples; a few Orthocladiinae were also taken. Among Chironominae, Chironomini (mostly Polypedilum spp., Cryptochironomus spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus) and Tanytarsini (mostly Tanytarsus spp.), and some other Chironomidae were recorded. Tanypodinae were quantitatively not important. Monthly mean number of total adults per trap-night ranged from 23 in February to 211 in October. Annual mean larval density and range of total chironomids in the study wetlands amounted to 1,128/m2, range: 0–12,332/m2. The total larvae were most abundant in May. Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. were numerically the most predominant spatially as well as temporally. Mean water depth at the sampled locations was 1.83 m (range: <1–8.75 m); 47% of the total collected larvae occurred at <1-m water depth and 53% at >1-m-deep water. Of all sampled locations, substrates such as sand, mixed substrates, and muck were respectively encountered at 656, 371, and 299 locations. The predominance of sand and mixed substrates was conducive to supporting the numerically dominant Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. In laboratory bioassays, Tanytarsus spp., Polypedilum spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus were highly susceptible to temephos, as well as to s-methoprene. Bacillus thuringiensis serovar. israelensis was most effective against Tanytarsus spp. and least against Goeldichironomus carus.

Arshad Ali, Robert J. Leckel, Nusrad Jahan, Salman A. Al-Shami, and Che Salmah MD. Rawi "Laboratory and Field Investigations of Pestiferous Chironomidae (Diptera) in Some Man-Made Wetlands in Central Florida, USA," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 25(1), 94-99, (1 March 2009). https://doi.org/10.2987/08-5798.1
Published: 1 March 2009
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KEYWORDS
Bacillus thuringiensis serovar. israelensis
Pestiferous midges
population management
s-methoprene
temephos
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