Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2011 Effect of Application Rate and Persistence of Boric Acid Sugar Baits Applied to Plants for Control of Aedes albopictus
Rui-de Xue, Günter C. Müller, Daniel L. Kline, Donald R. Barnard
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The use of toxic bait to kill adult Aedes albopictus is a safe and potentially effective alternative to the use of synthetic chemical insecticides. This study was carried out to determine effective concentrations of boric acid needed in sugar bait solutions applied to plant surfaces, and to determine its residual effect in reducing adult mosquito densities. In outdoor tests in 1,100-m3 screened enclosures, landing rates of Ae. albopictus on a human subject and the number of female mosquitoes in mechanical traps were significantly reduced by a 1% boric acid bait compared with the other tested concentrations (0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75%) and untreated control. Studies of the duration of boric acid activity on plant surfaces were made in 1.4-m3 cages in the laboratory and outdoors in 78-m3 screened enclosures. In the laboratory tests, 1% boric acid bait resulted in >96% mortality in male and female Ae. albopictus for 14 days, whereas in outdoor tests, mosquito landing rates in the treated enclosures were significantly lower than in the control enclosures for 7 days. Also, mosquito mortality responses to boric acid baits between plants with flowers and nonflowers (1.4-m3 cages in the laboratory) were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that boric acid baits applied to plant surfaces may provide specific data related to the development of an effective point-source–based adjunct/alternative to the use of conventional adulticides for mosquito control.

Rui-de Xue, Günter C. Müller, Daniel L. Kline, and Donald R. Barnard "Effect of Application Rate and Persistence of Boric Acid Sugar Baits Applied to Plants for Control of Aedes albopictus," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 27(1), 56-60, (1 March 2011). https://doi.org/10.2987/10-6069.1
Published: 1 March 2011
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top