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1 October 2005 AN AFRICAN GRASS, ERAGROSTIS CURVULA (POACEAE), PLANTED IN THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES RECRUITS RARELY COLLECTED NATIVE PLANTHOPPERS (HEMIPTERA: FULGOROIDEA: DICTYOPHARIDAE, FULGORIDAE)
Stephen W. Wilson, A. G. Wheeler Jr.
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Abstract

Included among numerous native insects that have colonized the introduced African bunchgrass Eragrostis curvula in the southern United States are four little-known fulgoroids not previously documented as grass feeders: the fulgorids Amycle vernalis Manee, Cyrpoptus belfragei Stål, and C. reineckei Van Duzee, and the dictyopharid Rhynchomitra microrhina (Walker). Male and female genitalia and nymphs of these planthoppers are described and illustrated; the distributions and host plants, both native and introduced, are listed; and notes on habitat associations and seasonal histories are provided. All four species appear to be at least bivoltine and grass generalists that use hosts in several subfamilies. Host-range expansions and colonization of novel plants by herbivores are discussed; we suggest that the architectural complexity of weeping lovegrass has played an important role in its colonization by native planthoppers.

Stephen W. Wilson and A. G. Wheeler Jr. "AN AFRICAN GRASS, ERAGROSTIS CURVULA (POACEAE), PLANTED IN THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES RECRUITS RARELY COLLECTED NATIVE PLANTHOPPERS (HEMIPTERA: FULGOROIDEA: DICTYOPHARIDAE, FULGORIDAE)," Journal of the New York Entomological Society 113(3), 174-204, (1 October 2005). https://doi.org/10.1664/0028-7199(2005)113[0174:AAGECP]2.0.CO;2
Received: 24 October 2004; Accepted: 30 August 2005; Published: 1 October 2005
KEYWORDS
Fulgoroidea
host expansion
Insecta
novel hosts
planthoppers
Poaceae
weeping lovegrass
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