Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2005 Production as a function of resource availability: Slopes and efficiencies are different
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

A number of investigators have interpreted the slope of a linear production-resource relationship as a measure of efficiency of resource utilization. However, this is rarely true and may lead to incorrect conclusions. Here, by means of simple mathematical equations and conceptual definitions, we point out the theoretical differences between slope and efficiency. While a slope represents the change in the dependent variable per unit change in the independent variable, efficiency expresses the amount of output produced by a unit amount of input. Practical implications of using slopes as indicators of resource-use efficiency are less important as the resource amount increases. Slopes may be used as indicators of the sensitivity of production to changes in input, which is by itself an interesting property of biological systems. Finally, production function intercepts determine whether the efficiency will decrease, increase, or remain constant as resources increase.

Santiago R. Verón, Martín Oesterheld, and José M. Paruelo "Production as a function of resource availability: Slopes and efficiencies are different," Journal of Vegetation Science 16(3), 351-354, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1658/1100-9233(2005)016[0351:PAAFOR]2.0.CO;2
Received: 29 October 2004; Accepted: 27 April 2005; Published: 1 June 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top