Open Access
Translator Disclaimer
1 January 1975 THE ROLE OF WILD MAMMALS IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BOVINE THEILERIOSES IN EAST AFRICA
M. J. BURRIDGE
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The Theileriidae of East African wild mammals are reviewed.

Three species of wild Bovidae were captured in East Africa. They were African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and eland (Taurotragus oryx), and all were found to be naturally infected with Theileria species. These animals were studied to determine the transmissibility and pathogenicity of their theilerial infections to cattle. Adult Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks, which had engorged as nymphs on buffalo, transmitted fatal Theileria lawrencei infections to cattle. African buffalo were shown to be continually infective for ticks over a period of many months, demonstrating that buffalo can remain a carrier of T. lawrencei. In contrast, attempts to transmit the Theileria of wildebeest and eland to cattle through rhipicephalid ticks failed, despite the establishment of these parasites of the ticks. The significance of these results is discussed in relation to the epidemiology of bovine theilerioses.

During these studies, Anaplasma marginale was transmitted by blood passage from wildebeest to splenectomized calves.

BURRIDGE: THE ROLE OF WILD MAMMALS IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BOVINE THEILERIOSES IN EAST AFRICA*
M. J. BURRIDGE "THE ROLE OF WILD MAMMALS IN THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BOVINE THEILERIOSES IN EAST AFRICA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 11(1), 68-75, (1 January 1975). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-11.1.68
Received: 11 August 1974; Published: 1 January 1975
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


Share
SHARE
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top