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1 August 2007 Hair Snares for Noninvasive Sampling of Felids in North America: Do Gray Foxes Affect Success?
PATRICIA J. DOWNEY, ERIC C. HELLGREN, ARTURO CASO, SASHA CARVAJAL, KERRI FRANGIOSO
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Abstract

Hair-snare sampling has become a popular technique to assess distribution and abundance of felids. Using standard hair-snaring protocols, we sampled for margays (Leopardus wiedii) in Mexico and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in California, USA, without success. However, we noted a preponderance of gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) hair at sampling stations. Our review of recent literature suggests a pattern of failure to detect target felids in hair-snare surveys conducted within the range of the gray fox. We propose, among several alternative explanations, that marking by gray foxes interferes with the tendency of felids to face-rub at sampling stations.

PATRICIA J. DOWNEY, ERIC C. HELLGREN, ARTURO CASO, SASHA CARVAJAL, and KERRI FRANGIOSO "Hair Snares for Noninvasive Sampling of Felids in North America: Do Gray Foxes Affect Success?," Journal of Wildlife Management 71(6), 2090-2094, (1 August 2007). https://doi.org/10.2193/2006-500
Published: 1 August 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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