Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2014 A PRESUMPTIVE CASE OF BAYLISASCARIS PROCYONIS IN A FERAL GREEN-CHEEKED AMAZON PARROT (AMAZONA VIRIDIGENALIS)
Lisa B. Done, Yoko Tamura
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

A feral green-cheeked Amazon parrot (Amazona viridigenalis), also known as the red-crowned Amazon, with generalized neurologic symptoms was found in Pasadena in Southern California and brought in for treatment. The bird was refractory to a wide variety of medications and supportive treatment. Tests for polyoma virus, psittacine beak and feather disease virus, and West Nile virus as well as Chlamydophila psittaci were negative. Hospitalized and home care continued for a total of 69 days. The bird was rehospitalized on day 66 for increasing severity of clinical signs and found 3 days later hanging with its head down, in respiratory arrest. Resuscitation was unsuccessful. There were no gross pathologic lesions. Histopathology showed a focal subcutaneous fungal caseous granuloma under the skin of the dorsum. Many sarcocysts morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis falcatula were found in the cytoplasm of the skeletal myofibers from skeletal muscles of different locations of this bird, a finding that was considered an incidental, clinically nonsignificant finding in this case. Necrosis with microscopic lesions typical of Baylisascaris spp. neural larva migrans was in the brain. Although multiple histologic serial sections of the brain were examined and a brain squash performed and analyzed, no Baylisascaris larvae were found. This is the first presumptive case of Baylisascaris in a feral psittacine.

American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Lisa B. Done and Yoko Tamura "A PRESUMPTIVE CASE OF BAYLISASCARIS PROCYONIS IN A FERAL GREEN-CHEEKED AMAZON PARROT (AMAZONA VIRIDIGENALIS)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 45(1), 157-160, (1 March 2014). https://doi.org/10.1638/2012-0263R1.1
Received: 7 November 2012; Published: 1 March 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top