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1 April 2015 Food Habits of Jaguar and Puma in a Protected Area and Adjacent Fragmented Landscape of Northeastern Mexico
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Abstract

We analyzed the food habits of the jaguar (Panthera onca) and puma (Puma concolor) in a protected area surrounded by a fragmented landscape in northeastern Mexico. We estimated relative biomass of each prey species consumed; by analysis of 43 and 22 scat samples of jaguar and puma collected during 2010–2012. The diet of both felids was comprised mainly of wild artiodactyls; the collared peccary contributed 35.2% to the biomass of jaguar diets and white-tailed deer contributed 51.9% to puma diets. Diet composition of both felids showed moderate overlap (Pianka index = 0.57; Morisita index = 0.58), but use of the primary prey differed between species (P < 0.001). The diet of both felids included almost exclusively wild species, suggesting the presence of a good prey base that allows the coexistence of jaguars and pumas. Despite its small size and surrounding fragmentation, the Biosphere Reserve Sierra del Abra-Tanchipa is still an important refuge for large felids and their prey in northeastern Mexico.

Anuar D. Hernández-SaintMartín, Octavio C. Rosas-Rosas, Jorge Palacio-Núñez, Luis A. Tarango-Arambula, Fernando Clemente-Sánchez, and Almira L. Hoogesteijn "Food Habits of Jaguar and Puma in a Protected Area and Adjacent Fragmented Landscape of Northeastern Mexico," Natural Areas Journal 35(2), 308-317, (1 April 2015). https://doi.org/10.3375/043.035.0213
Published: 1 April 2015
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