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1 March 2001 Light Irradiation Induces Fragmentation of the Plasmodium, a Novel Photomorphogenesis in the True Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum: Action Spectra and Evidence for Involvement of the Phytochrome
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Abstract

A new photomorphogenesis was found in the plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum: the plasmodium broke temporarily into equal-sized spherical pieces, each containing about eight nuclei, about 5 h after irradiation with light. Action spectroscopic study showed that UVA, blue and far-red lights were effective, while red light inhibited the far-red–induced fragmentation. Difference absorption spectra of both the living plasmodium and the plasmodial homogenate after alternate irradiation with far-red and red light gave two extremes at 750 and 680 nm, which agreed with those for the induction and inhibition of the fragmentation, respectively. A kinetic model similar to that of phytochrome action explained quantitatively the fluence rate–response curves of the fragmentation. Our results indicate that one of the photoreceptors for the plasmodial fragmentation is a phytochrome.

Yasutaka Kakiuchi, Tetsuo Takahashi, Akio Murakami, and Tetsuo Ueda "Light Irradiation Induces Fragmentation of the Plasmodium, a Novel Photomorphogenesis in the True Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum: Action Spectra and Evidence for Involvement of the Phytochrome," Photochemistry and Photobiology 73(3), 324-329, (1 March 2001). https://doi.org/10.1562/0031-8655(2001)073<0324:LIIFOT>2.0.CO;2
Received: 16 October 2000; Accepted: 1 December 2000; Published: 1 March 2001
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