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1 August 2003 Response of Rat Skin to High-Dose Unidirectional X-Ray Microbeams: A Histological Study
Nan Zhong, Gerard M. Morris, Tigran Bacarian, Eliot M. Rosen, F. Avraham Dilmanian
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Abstract

Zhong, N., Morris, G. M., Bacarian, T., Rosen, E. M. and Dilmanian F. A. Response of Rat Skin to High-Dose Unidirectional X-Ray Microbeams: A Histological Study. Radiat. Res. 160, 133–142 (2003).

There is growing interest in evaluating microbeam radiation therapy as a potential clinical modality. Microbeam radiation therapy uses arrays of parallel, microscopically thin (<100 μm) planes of synchrotron-generated X rays (microplanar beams, or microbeams). Due to the relatively low beam energies involved in microbeam radiation therapy (a median beam energy of 120 keV was used in the present study), the dose penetration of microbeams in tissue is lower than that used in conventional radiotherapy. This lower energy necessitates using a significantly elevated dose to the skin's surface during clinical microbeam therapy to ensure an adequate dose distribution in the target tumor. The findings of the present study, using a rat skin model, indicated that the skin had an extremely high tolerance to microbeam radiation at doses considerably in excess of those that were therapeutically effective in preclinical studies. A histological study was undertaken to evaluate the biological mechanisms underlying this high tolerance. The irradiation configuration employed single-exposure, unidirectional microbeams 90 μm wide, with 300 μm beam spacing on-center. The in-beam skin-surface absorbed doses were in the range 835–1335 Gy. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose distribution indicated that the “valley” dose, i.e. the radiation leakage between adjacent microbeams, was about 2.5% of the in-beam dose. The high tolerance of the rats' skin to microbeams and the rapid regeneration of the damaged segments of skin were attributed to the surviving clonogenic cells situated between the adjacent microplanar beams. In the epidermis, clonogenic cells in the hair follicular epithelium appeared to play a key role in the regeneration process.

Nan Zhong, Gerard M. Morris, Tigran Bacarian, Eliot M. Rosen, and F. Avraham Dilmanian "Response of Rat Skin to High-Dose Unidirectional X-Ray Microbeams: A Histological Study," Radiation Research 160(2), 133-142, (1 August 2003). https://doi.org/10.1667/3033
Received: 6 January 2003; Accepted: 1 March 2003; Published: 1 August 2003
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