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1 October 2013 Use of Rotational Stocking in Combination With Cultural Practices for Smutgrass Control—A Florida Case Study
Joseph H. Walter, Yoana C. Newman, Sharon F. Gamble, Dennis M. Mudge, Pete Deal, Matheus Baseggio, Ashley Fluke
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Abstract

On the Ground

  • Smutgrass (Sporobolus indicus) is an invasive plant in Florida sandy soils, prevalent in central and south Florida where temperatures seldom drop below freezing and hard frost events are infrequent.

  • Smutgrass becomes nonpalatable to cattle as it matures and cattle avoid grazing it after the emergence of seed stalks and when leaves become tough. However, young smutgrass growth is palatable to cattle.

  • High stocking densities in combination with severe defoliation have proven deleterious for this grass. This study evaluated the use of increased stock density and rotational grazing management for 3 years following a one-time defoliation by mowing or burning smutgrass infested pastures.

Joseph H. Walter, Yoana C. Newman, Sharon F. Gamble, Dennis M. Mudge, Pete Deal, Matheus Baseggio, and Ashley Fluke "Use of Rotational Stocking in Combination With Cultural Practices for Smutgrass Control—A Florida Case Study," Rangelands 35(5), 98-103, (1 October 2013). https://doi.org/10.2111/RANGELANDS-D-13-00023.1
Published: 1 October 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES


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