Open Access
How to translate text using browser tools
22 February 2023 Eriophyoid mite species associated with Acer monspessulanum L. in Urmia region of Iran
Parisa Lotfollahi, Mojtaba Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, Mohammad Bagheri
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

With the aim of obtaining more information about eriophyoid mites of Iran, eriophyoid fauna of Montpellier maples (Acer monspessulanum L.) in Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran was studied. In total, four eriophyoid species were identified; two of them, Aceria azerbaijaniensis Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov. and Cecidophyes aceressulani Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov., were new in science. A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov. is the third Aceria species found on Sapindaceae plants in Iran. C. aceressulani sp. nov. is the third Cecidophyes species in Iran and the first Cecidophyes species found on Sapindaceae plants of Iran. In addition, Rhyncaphytoptus saccharini Keifer, 1959 herein was recorded for the first time in Iran.

Introduction

Maples are a well-known, diverse and versatile group of trees and shrubs, belonging to the genus Acer (Sapindaceae). There are approximately 164 Acer species worldwide (The World Flora Online 2022); most of which are native to Asia (Mohtashamian et al. 2017), while a few appear in Europe, northern Africa, and North America (Gibbs & Chen 2009).

Until now more than 90 eriophyoid species were described from maples (Acer spp.) worldwide (Amrine and de Lillo unpublished database). Among them just five species have been found in Iran (Table 1). None of them belong to the genus Cecidophyes and two of them belong to the genus Aceria.

Eight Acer species occur in Iran, most of which are in the northern part of the country (Mohtashamian et al. 2017). With the aim of obtaining more information about eriophyoid mites of Iran, we decided to investigate maples eriophyoid mite species in Urmia region of West Azerbaijan province, Iran. As a result, information about eriophyoid species associated with maples of this region is presented here.

Material and methods

For our survey of eriophyoid mites of Urmia county, we sampled Montpellier maples in Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province of Iran during September 2021.

Eriophyoid mites were recovered from the plant material by means of a modified washing method developed by Monfreda et al. (2007).

The collected specimens were slide mounted according to Mehri-Heyran et al. (2020).

The terminology and the setal notation in the morphological description of the mite follow mainly Lindquist (1996) and terminology of the internal female genital apparatus follows Chetverikov (2014) and Chetverikov et al. (2014).

TABLE 1.

List of species found on Acer spp. in Iran.

img-z2-5_309.gif

All morphological measurements were taken by means of a phase contrast microscope Olympus BX53, 1,000 magnification (oil immersion) according to Amrine and Manson (1996) as modified by de Lillo et al. (2010), and are given in micrometers. Counting of dorsal, ventral and coxigenital semiannuli follows Lotfollahi et al. (2020). Measurements and means are rounded off to the nearest integer when required except for characters with very short length. Measurements refer to the length of the morphological trait unless otherwise specified and are given in micrometers. In the female description, the holotype measurements are followed by range values, in parentheses, of the studied population (i.e. holotype and paratypes) and for males and immature stages, only the range values are given. The mean values of the paratypes are reported in the few cases in which the measurements of the holotype could not be taken, due to the slide mounting position of the specimens and were marked by an asterisk (*) in the description.

Line drawings were hand-drawn through a camera lucida according to de Lillo et al. (2010) and the plates were edited with Adobe Photoshop CC 2017. The abbreviations labelling schematic drawings in figures follow mainly Amrine et al. (2003).

The genera classification follows Amrine et al. (2003) and comparisons were also made with new genera described since that publication.

Host plant names and their synonymies are in accordance with "The World Flora Online" (2022).

Type materials are deposited at the Acarology Laboratory, Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran).

Results

In this study we found symptoms on maple leaves (Fig. 1). After examining under the stereomicroscope and preparing relevant photos, the leaf samples were washed and the extracted mites were mounted on 46 microscopic slides, which resulted in four mite species—Aceria macrochela (Nalepa, 1891), Aceria azerbaijaniensis Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov., Cecidophyes aceressulani Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov., and Rhyncaphytoptus saccharini Keifer, 1959. The microscopic slides and the mites mounted in them are listed in below:

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-1: holotype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 female of R. saccharini; 1 paratype of female C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-2: holotype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.; 1 female of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-3: 3 paratype females of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-4: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-5: 1 paratype male of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 female of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-6: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-7: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 nymph of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-8: 2 paratype females of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 male of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-9: 2 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 female of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-10: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 nymph of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-11: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-12: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.; 1 female of R. saccharini

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-13: 2 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-14: 1 paratype male of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-15–18: each with 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-19: 1 paratype female of A. azerbaijaniensis sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-20: 1 paratype male and 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-21: 1 nymph of R. saccharini; 1 paratype male of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-22: 1 paratype nymph of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-23: 1 paratype nymph and 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-24: 1 paratype male of C. aceressulani sp. nov.; 1 female of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-25: 2 females of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-26: 2 females of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-27: 1 paratype male of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-28: 1 male of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-29: 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-30: 2 paratype females of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-31: 1 female of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-32: 1 female of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-33: 1 female of R. saccharini; 1 paratype female of C. aceressulani sp. nov.

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-34–39: each with 1 female of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-40–43: each with 2 females of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-44: 1 female and 1 nymph of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-45: 1 male of A. macrochela

  • AM-IWA-BJ21D-46: 1 larva of A. macrochela

  • Considering that similar symptoms for A. macrochela have been expressed as making rounded galls with 2–4 mm diameter, with hard walls, often in angles between veins, and many-celled hairs on the inner surface. These symptoms have also been reported from different countries including Iran (Amrine and de Lillo unpublished database). We therefore consider that the signs of damage in figure 1 is related to the species A. macrochela and the remaining three species can be considered vagrant or inquiline species.

    Family Eriophyidae Nalepa
    Subfamily Eriophyinae Nalepa
    Tribe Aceriini Amrine et Stasny
    Aceria macrochela (Nalepa, 1891)

  • Type data

  • Acer campestre L. (Sapindaceae); type locality not stated by the author and Austria is presumed.

  • Relation to the host plant

  • Making rounded galls with 2–4 mm diameter, with hard walls, often in angles between veins; inner surface of galls with many-celled hairs (Amrine and de Lillo unpublished database). During the current study, similar symptoms were found on the leaves of Montpellier maple, A. monspessulanum too (Fig. 1).

  • Previous provincial records for Iran

  • Gilan (Trotter 1903) and Fars provinces (Doryanizadeh et al. 2013).

  • Localities and host plant

  • Seventeen females, one male, one nymph and one larva from A. monspessulanum mounted on microscope slides (AM-IWA-BJ21D-2,24, 34–46); Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran (37°18′21″N, 45°06′29″E), 1,479 m above sea level; coll. M. Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, 21 September 2021.

  • FIGURE 1.

    Symptoms observed on the leaves of Montpellier maple, caused by Aceria macrochela (Nalepa, 1891).

    img-z4-8_309.jpg

    Aceria azerbaijaniensis Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov.

  • Description

  • FEMALE (Fig. 2; measured specimens n=7). Body vermiform, 180 (180–195, excluding gnathosoma), 52* (49–58) thick, 52* (49–58) wide. Gnathosoma projecting obliquely downwards, cheliceral stylets 27 (27–33), palp 28 (28–31), palp coxal setae ep 3 (2–3), dorsal palp genual setae d 8 (7–8), unbranched. Suboral plate rounded anteriorly, ornamented with distinct dense granules. Prodorsal shield 36 (35–39) including frontal lobe, 38 (38–41) wide, sub-triangular; with a long rectangular frontal lobe, 12 (11–13), over gnathosomal base. Shield pattern indistinct, consisting of complete very faint median line, complete admedian lines that are distinct on their basal third and faint on remained parts, short outer submedian lines and one pair of lateral lines made by connected granules and dashes; a small depression in front of setae sc tubercles; shield lateral parts with dense granules and ocellar spot above coxae II. Tubercles of scapular setae sc on rear shield margin, 19 (19–20) apart, setae sc 26 (24–27), very fine on most part, directed posterior. Legs with all usual segments and setae. Leg I 33 (31–35), trochanter 5 (4–6), femur 9 (9–10), genu 5 (5–6), tibia 7 (7–9), tarsus 9 (8–9), tarsal solenidion ω 9 (9–10), curved down, distally enlarged and tapered, empodium simple, 9 (8–10), 5-rayed; femoral setae bv 11 (11–13), genual setae l″ 21 (20–25), paraxial tibial setae l′ 8 (no variation), located in middle of tibia, paraxial fastigial tarsal setae ft′ 15 (14–18), antaxial fastigial tarsal setae ft″ 26 (24–27), paraxial unguinal tarsal setae u′ 4 (4–5). Leg II 30 (30–34), trochanter 5 (4–5), femur 8 (8–10), genu 6 (5–6), tibia 5 (5–6), tarsus 8 (8–9), tarsal solenidion ω 9 (9–10), curved down, distally enlarged and tapered, empodium simple, 8 (8–9), 5-rayed; femoral setae bv 11 (10–13), genual setae l″ 8 (8–11), paraxial fastigial tarsal setae ft′ 7 (6–8), antaxial fastigial tarsal setae ft″ 26 (21–28), paraxial unguinal tarsal setae u′ 4 (4–5). Coxisternal region. Prosternal apodeme 5 (5–6), seems to be formed at a distance from the front edge of the coxisternum I (invisible on the front(; anterior setae on coxisternum I 1b 12* (11–13), 11 (11–12) apart; proximal setae on coxisternum I 1a 33 (31–35), 8 (7–9) apart; proximal setae on coxisternum II 2a 42 (40–45), 22 (21–25) apart; 8 (8–10) very narrow microtuberculate semiannuli between coxae and genital coverflap plus 4 (no variation) transversal rows of granules at the base of the coverflap. Coxae with dense distinct granules. External genitalia 9 (8–12), 19 (18–21) wide, coverflap with 9 (8–9) longitudinal striae; setae 3a 33 (30–38), 14 (13–15) apart. Internal genitalia: spermathecae circular, oriented posterolaterad; spermathecal tubes relatively short as long as third of spermathecal length, with tiny cone-shaped spermathecal process situated at the back end of spermathecal tube; transverse genital apodeme trapezoidal, distally folded. Opisthosoma dorsally evenly rounded, with 72 (70–77) dorsal semiannuli, 60 (53–60) ventral semiannuli. Microtubercles: oval, on posterior part of dorsal semiannuli; circular, on posterior part of ventral semiannuli, elongated and linear on last 3 (3–4) ventral semiannuli. Setae c2 29 (28–31) on ventral semiannulus 11 (9–11), setae d 48 (48–53) on ventral semiannulus 22 (19–24); setae e 15 (15–20) on ventral semiannulus 38 (32–39); setae f 24 (22–27) on ventral semiannulus 56 (49–56); 4 (no variation) annuli posterior to setae f. Setae h2 78 (75–90) apically very fine, h1 3 (3–4).

  • MALE (Fig. 2-GM; measured specimen n=1). Similar in shape and prodorsal shield arrangement to female. Body smaller than female, 155, 42 wide, 42 thick; palp genual setae d 7; prodorsal shield 31, 30 wide; setae sc 22, 19 apart. Opisthosoma with 61 dorsal semiannuli and 66 ventral semiannuli; 10 semiannuli between coxae and genitalia, with microtubercles similar to that of female. Setae: 1b 11, 1a 23, 2a 36, c2 26, d 47, e 14, f 20, h1 4, h2 45. Male genitalia 15 wide, setae 3a 22, 12 apart.

  • Type host plant

  • Acer monspessulanum L. (Sapindaceae), Montpellier maple.

  • Type locality

  • Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran (37°18′21″N, 45°06′29″E), 1,479 m above sea level, coll. M. Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, 21 September 2021.

  • Type material

  • Holotype: mounted on a microscope slide (AM-IWA-BJ21D-1). Paratypes: 14 females and 1 male mounted on microscope slides (AM-IWA-BJ21D-3–12,19).

  • Other material

  • Mites preserved in a vial (AM-IWA-BJ21D) of Oudemans' fluid (Walter & Krantz 2009) as extracted from the same sample as the type specimens.

  • Relation to the host plant

  • Mites were vagrant or inquiline on the leaves that damaged by A. macrochela (Fig. 1).

  • Distribution

  • Since the host plant of the new species described in this research has a wide distribution in the northern part of Iran, it is expected that this species will be found in other regions with further studies.

  • Etymology

  • The specific epithet, azerbaijaniensis refers to the type locality, Azerbaijan area in northwest of Iran.

  • Differential diagnosis

  • The new species was compared with all Aceria species found on Acer spp. Aceria antonimus (Keifer, 1962) was a similar species that was described as vagrant mites in hair masses at petiole bases around expanded buds of its host plant, Acer negundo var. californicum (Torr. & Grey) Sarg. in Sacramento, California, USA (Keifer 1962).

  • Keifer describes the prodorsal shield of A. antonimus as follows: “Shield 36 long, 29 wide, somewhat elongate and subtriangular in general shape. Prominent, rather narrow frontal lobe, about 14 Iong, blunt apically, thin dorsoventrally. Shield design suppressed, the admedian lines present on rear 2/3, diverging to rear margin and slightly converging there. Shield laterally granular”. The new species has prodorsal shield with equal length but is wider (38–41). It has a rectangular frontal lobe with equal length (11–13). The prodorsal shield has a complete very faint median line, complete admedian lines that are distinct on their basal third and faint anteriorly. Considering the accuracy of the equipment used by Kiefer, it can be said that the two species are similar in this respect. The new species has short outer submedian lines and one pair of lateral lines made by connected granules and dashes, a small depression in front of setae sc tubercles and with dense granules and an ocellar spot on lateral prodorsal shield. However, Kiefer did not provide any description similar to these in A. antonimus. In addition, in both species the coxae are ornamented with numerous granules and the genital coverflap has similar number of longitudinal striae.

  • However, the new species has more dorsal semiannuli (70–77 in the new species versus 55 in A. antonimus), more empodial ray number (5 in the new species versus 4 in A. antonimus), and longer setae sc 24–27 in the new species versus 13 in A. antonimus), c2 (28–31 in the new species versus 14 in A. antonimus), d (48–53 in the new species versus 35 in A. antonimus), e (15–20 in the new species versus 11 in A. antonimus), f (22–27 in the new species versus 19 in A. antonimus) and 3a (30–38 in the new species versus 10 in A. antonimus).

  • Remarks

  • This is the third Aceria species found on Sapindaceae plants in Iran.

  • FIGURE 2.

    Schematic drawings of Aceria azerbaijaniensis Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov.: AD. Prodorsal shield; ADL. Dorso-lateral view of female anterior body region; CG. Female coxigenital region; em. Empodium; GM. Male genital region; IG. Internal female genitalia; LO. Lateral view of annuli; L1. Leg I; PM. Lateral view of posterior opisthosoma. Scale bar: 14 µm for LO; 10 µm for ADL, CG, GM, IG, PM; 5 µm for L1; 2.5 µm for em.

    img-z6-2_309.jpg

    Subfamily Cecidophyinae Keifer
    Tribe Cecidophyini Keifer
    Cecidophyes aceressulani Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov.

  • Description

  • FEMALE (Fig. 3; measured specimens n=8). Body fusiform, 206 (183–229, excluding gnathosoma), 59* (56–62) thick, 61 (49–61) wide. Gnathosoma projecting obliquely downwards, cheliceral stylets 31 (30–37), palp 29 (27–29), palp coxal setae ep 3 (3–4), dorsal palp genual setae d 8 (7–8), unbranched. Suboral plate smooth, with rounded protrusion anteriorly. Prodorsal shield 39 (35–39) including frontal lobe, 42 (38–42) wide, sub-triangular; with a broad and blunt frontal lobe, 12 (9–12), over gnathosomal base. Shield pattern distinct, reticulated consisting of 24 closed and opened cells made by complete median, admedian, inner and outer submedian lines and two pair of lateral lines and 14 pairs of transverse lines; lateral lines with distinct granules on them. Tubercles of scapular setae sc and setae sc absent. Legs with all usual segments and setae. Leg I 30 (28–33), trochanter 5 (4–5), femur 8 (8–10), genu 6 (5–6), tibia 7 (6–9), tarsus 8 (8–9), tarsal solenidion ω 9 (9–10), curved down, distally tapered, empodium simple, 9 (8–10), 8-rayed; femoral setae bv 19 (18–20), genual setae l″ 29 (24–30), paraxial tibial setae l′ 9 (9–12), located in basal third of tibia, paraxial fastigial tarsal setae ft′ 18 (18–20), antaxial fastigial tarsal setae ft″ 25 (25–28), paraxial unguinal tarsal setae u′ 6 (5–6). Leg II 29 (27–30), trochanter 5 (no variation), femur 9 (7–10), genu 5* (4–6), tibia 5 (5–6), tarsus 8 (7–8), tarsal solenidion ω 10 (no variation), curved down, distally tapered, empodium simple, 9 (no variation), 8-rayed; femoral setae bv 20 (20–22), genual setae l″ 10 (10–12), paraxial fastigial tarsal setae ft′ 9 (9–11), antaxial fastigial tarsal setae ft″ 28 (22–28), paraxial unguinal tarsal setae u′ 6 (6–7). Coxisternal region. Coxae I narrowly connate at center line and made short prosternal apodeme 3 (3–3.5), anterior setae on coxisternum I 1b 8* (7–11), 12 (12–14) apart; proximal setae on coxisternum I 1a 24 (19–24), 13 (12–13) apart; proximal setae on coxisternum II 2a 40 (30–40), 28 (27–28) apart; 7* (6–7) microtuberculate semiannuli between coxae and genital coverflap. Coxae with very few distinct lines. Genitalia appressed to coxae; External genitalia 12 (10–12), 21 (20–23) wide, coverflap with longitudinal striae broken in two uneven ranks; anterior rank (closer to the coxae) with 12 (10–12) longitudinal striae and posterior rank with 13 (12–13) longitudinal striae; setae 3a 29 (24–30), 16 (14–18) apart. Internal genitalia: spermathecae ovoid, oriented laterad; spermathecal tubes relatively short as long as half of spermathecae diameter; transverse genital apodeme bent up and distally folded. Opisthosoma dorsally evenly rounded, with 47 (40–48) dorsal semiannuli, 68 (61–71) ventral semiannuli. Microtubercles: triangular, on posterior margin of dorsal semiannuli and on posterior part of ventral semiannuli, elongated and linear on last 7 (6–7) ventral semiannuli. Setae c2 26 (21–28) on ventral semiannulus 8 (8–9), setae d 43* (39–51) on ventral semiannulus 25 (21–25); setae e 11 (10–12) on ventral semiannulus 39 (30–39); setae f 23* (21–25) on ventral semiannulus 66 (56–66); 5 (4–5) annuli posterior to setae f. Setae h2 65 (55–66) apically very fine, h1 absent.

  • MALE (Fig. 3-GM; measured specimens n=3). Similar in shape and prodorsal shield arrangement to female. Body smaller than female, 172–180, 50 wide, 47–48 thick; palp genual setae d 5–6; prodorsal shield 32–35, 31–38 wide; tubercles of scapular setae sc and setae sc absent. Opisthosoma with 35–39 dorsal semiannuli and 57–61 ventral semiannuli; 5–7 semiannuli between coxae and genitalia, with microtubercles similar to that of female. Setae: 1b 5–8, 1a 17–21, 2a 32–38, c2 20–21, d 34–45, e 7–10, f 16–17, h1 absent, h2 60–63. Male genitalia 16–18 wide, setae 3a 17–19, 14–15 apart.

  • NYMPH (measured specimens n=2). Body fusiform, 160–170 (excluding gnathosoma), 57 wide, 45 thick; palp genual setae d 5. Prodorsal shield 28–29 including frontal lobe, 26–32 wide, it's shape and ornamentation seems to be similar to the females, but due to the poor clearing quality of the nymph slide mounted dorsoventrally, its pattern details could not be drawn. Tubercles of sc setae and setae sc absent. Opisthosoma with 41–45 dorsal semiannuli and 45–49 ventral semiannuli, with microtubercles similar to females. Setae: 1b 6–7, 1a 17, 2a 31–33, c2 18–22, d 24–29, e 8–9, f 16–18, h2 36–48, h1 absent. Setae 3a 15–18, 8–9 apart on semiannulus 8 after coxae; empodium 7-rayed

  • Type host plant

  • Acer monspessulanum L. (Sapindaceae), Montpellier maple.

  • Type locality

  • Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran (37°18′21″N, 45°06′29″E), 1,479 m above sea level, coll. M. Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, 21 September 2021.

  • Type material

  • Holotype: mounted on a microscope slide (AM-IWA-BJ21D-2). Paratypes: 17 females, 5 male and 2 nymphs mounted on microscope slides (AM-IWA-BJ21D-1,4,13–18,20–33).

  • Other material

  • Mites preserved in a vial (AM-IWA-BJ21D) of Oudemans' fluid (Walter & Krantz 2009) as extracted from the same sample as the type specimens.

  • Relation to the host plant

  • Mites were vagrant or inquiline on the leaves that damaged by A. macrochela (Fig. 1).

  • Distribution

  • Since the host plant of the new species described in this research has a wide distribution in the northern part of Iran, it is expected that this species will be found in other regions with further studies.

  • Etymology

  • The specific epithet comes from the combination of the genus name, Acer-, and the last seven letters of species name, -essulani, of the type host plant.

  • Differential diagnosis

  • The new species was compared with all Cecidophyes species found on maples. The closest species was Cecidophyes campestris de Lillo et Fontana, 1996, collected and described on Acer campestre L. in Maser, Treviso Province, Veneto, Italy. In both species prodorsal shield is reticulated, and the opisthosoma with similar dorsal semiannuli (44–51 in C. campestris and 40–48 in the new species) and a similar number of coxigenital annuli (7 in C. campestris and 6–7 in the new species) and similar length of setae c2 (28–33 in C. campestris and 21–28 in the new species), d (40–70 in C. campestris and 39–51 in the new species), e (10–15 in C. campestris and 10–12 in the new species) and f (27–30 in C. campestris and 21–25 in the new species). However, there are differences between the two species in ventral semiannuli number (59–65 in C. campestris versus 61–71 in the new species), empodial ray number (6 in C. campestris versus 8 in the new species) and length of setae 3a (15–21 in C. campestris versus 24–30 in the new species). In C. campestris, the prodorsal shield is composed of 14 closed and opened cells, while the new species has 24 closed and opened cells. Microtubercles of C. campestris are bead-like and slightly pointed over margins but in the new species semiannuli are ornamented by triangular microtubercles on their rear margin.

  • Remarks

  • Until now two Cecidophyes species have been found in Iran on plants of genus Quercus including: C. digephyrus Keifer, 1966 from Q. vaccinifolia Kell. in Mazandaran province (Ranjbar-Varandi et al. 2019) and C. aliabadi Gol et al., 2018 from Q. castaneifolia C. A. Mey. in Golestan province (Gol et al. 2018). C. aceressulani Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov. is the third Cecidophyes species of Iran and the first Cecidophyes species found in Sapindaceae plants of Iran.

  • Family Diptilomiopidae Keifer
    Subfamily Rhyncaphytoptinae Roivainen
    Rhyncaphytoptus saccharini Keifer, 1959

  • Type data

  • Acer saccharinum L. (Sapindaceae), Silver Maple; University of Maryland Campus, College Park, Maryland, USA.

  • Relation to the host plant

  • Vagrant on underside of the leaves. In this study mites were vagrant on the leaves that damaged by A. macrochela (Fig. 1).

  • Localities and host plant

  • Eleven females, two males and three nymphs from A. monspessulanum mounted on microscope slides (AM-IWA-BJ21D-1,5,7–10,12,21,25,26,28,31–33); Khan valley, Baranduzchay-ye Jonubi Rural District, Urmia county, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran (37°18′21″N, 45°06′29″E), 1,479 m above sea level; coll. M. Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, 21 September 2021.

  • Remarks

  • The only difference between Iranian specimens compared with Keifer's description is in the number of dorsal semiannuli (46–51 in Iranian specimens versus 60–65 in Keifer description). Other characteristics match well with the original description. This is the first record of this species from Iran.

  • FIGURE 3.

    Schematic drawings of Cecidophyes aceressulani Lotfollahi et Mohammad-Doustaresharaf sp. nov.: AD. Prodorsal shield; AL. Lateral view of anterior body region; CG. Female coxigenital region; em. Empodium; GM. Male genital region; IG. Internal female genitalia; LO. Lateral view of annuli; L1. Leg I; pg. palp genua; PM. Lateral view of posterior opisthosoma. Scale bar: 14 µm for LO; 10 µm for AD, AL, CG, GM, IG, pg, PM; 5 µm for L1; 2.5 µm for em.

    img-z11-2_309.jpg

    Acknowledgements

    The authors are grateful to Emeritus Prof. James W. Amrine Jr. (West Virginia University, USA), Senior Prof. Carlos H.W. Flechtmann (University of Sao Paulo, Brazil), Prof. Radmila Petanović (University of Belgrade, Serbia), Prof. Enrico de Lillo (University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy) and Dr. Philipp E. Chetverikov (Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia) for their precious comments on improving this manuscript. This research was partially supported by Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University (Iran) and Iran National Science Foundation (INSF) under grant number 99022087, which are greatly appreciated.

    References

    1.

    Amrine, J.W. Jr. & Manson, D.C.M. (1996) Preparation, mounting and descriptive study of Eriophyoid mites. In : Lindquist, E.E., Sabelis, M.W. & Bruin, J. (Eds.), Eriophyoid Mites. Their Biology, Natural Enemies and Control. World Crop Pests. Vol.6. Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Elsevier Science Publishers, pp. 383–396.  https://doi.org/10.1016/S1572-4379(96)80023-6  Google Scholar

    2.

    Amrine, J.W. Jr., Stasny, T.A.H. & Flechtmann, C.H.W. (2003) Revised Keys to World Genera of Eriophyoidea (Acari: Prostigmata). West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA, Indira Publishing House, 244 pp. Google Scholar

    3.

    Chetverikov, P.E. (2014) Comparative confocal microscopy of internal genitalia of phytoptine mites (Eriophyoidea, Phytoptidae): new generic diagnoses reflecting host–plant associations. Experimental and Applied Acarology , 62, 129–160.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10493–013–9734–2  Google Scholar

    4.

    Chetverikov, P.E., Craemer, C., Vishnyakov, A.E. & Sukhareva, S.I. (2014) CLSM anatomy of internal genitalia of Mackiella reclinata n.sp. and systematic remarks on eriophyoid mites from the tribe Mackiellini Keifer, 1946 (Eriophyoidea, Phytoptidae). Zootaxa , 3860(3), 261–279.  https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3860.3.5  Google Scholar

    5.

    de Lillo, E. & Fontana, P. (1996) New eriophyoid mites (Acari Eriophyoidea) from Italy, II. Entomologica , 30, 135–146. Google Scholar

    6.

    de Lillo, E., Craemer, C., Amrine, J.W. Jr. & Nuzzaci, G. (2010) Recommended procedures and techniques for morphological studies of Eriophyoidea (Acari: Prostigmata). Experimental and Applied Acarology , 51, 283–307.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10493-009-9311-x  Google Scholar

    7.

    Doryanizadeh, N., Akrami, M.A. & Kamali, H. (2013) Eriophyoidea (Acari: Trombidiformes; Prostigmata) fauna of Shiraz County, Iran. Persian Journal of Acarology , 2(2), 331–334. Google Scholar

    8.

    Gharezare, M., Kamali, H. & Shirdel, D. (2013) Mite fauna of the superfamily Eriophyoidea (Acari: Prostigmata) associated with landscape plants and trees in Mashhad city, Iran. Proceedings of the 2nd International Persian Congress of Acarology, August 29–31, University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran, 11 pp. Google Scholar

    9.

    Gibbs, D. & Chen, Y. (2009) The Red List of Maples. Richmond, UK, Botanic Gardens Conservation International, 45 pp. Google Scholar

    10.

    Gol, A., Sadeghi, H. & de Lillo, E. (2018) Two new eriophyoid mite species (Acari: Trombidiformes: Eriophyoidea) on Quercus castaneifolia in Iran. Systematic & Applied Acarology , 23(11), 2104–2112.  https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.23.11.3  Google Scholar

    11.

    Kamali, H. & Amrine, J.W. Jr. (2005) Studies on the eriophyid mites (Acari: Eriophyidae) of Iran: two new species of Aceria, with a key to Iranian species. International Journal of Acarology , 31(1), 57–62.  https://doi.org/10.1080/01647950508684417  Google Scholar

    12.

    Kamali, K., Ostovan, H. & Atamehr, A. (2001) A Catalogue of Mites and Ticks (Acari) of Iran. Islamic Azad University Scientific Publication Center, Tehran, 198 pp. Google Scholar

    13.

    Keifer, H.H. (1959) Eriophyid studies XXVIII. Occasional Papers. California Department of Agriculture , 2, 1–20. Google Scholar

    14.

    Keifer, H.H. (1962) Eriophyid Studies B-7. Bureau of Entomology, California Department of Agriculture , 1–20. Google Scholar

    15.

    Lindquist, E.E. (1996) External anatomy and notation of structures. In : Lindquist, E.E., Sabelis, M.W. & Bruin, J. (Eds.), Eriophyoid Mites. Their Biology, Natural Enemies and Control. World Crop Pests, 6, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Elsevier Science Publishers, pp. 3–31.  https://doi.org/10.1016/S1572-4379(96)80003-0  Google Scholar

    16.

    Lotfollahi, P., Ranjbar-Varandi, F., Bahirai, F., Jafari, S. & Shakarami, J. (2020) Two new Aceria species (Acari: Eriophyidae) from Lorestan province of Iran. Systematic & Applied Acarology , 25, 1169–1177.  https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.25.7.1  Google Scholar

    17.

    Mehri-Heyran, H., Lotfollahi, P., de Lillo, E. & Azimi, S. (2020) Eriophyoid (Trombidiformes: Eriophyoidea) mite fauna of Miandoab region in Iran with redescription of Aceria kiefferi (Nalepa). Persian Journal of Acarology , 9, 161–171.  https://doi.org/10.22073/pja.v9i2.59382  Google Scholar

    18.

    Mohtashamian, M.S., Attar, F., Kavousi, K. & Masoudi-nejad, A. (2017) Biogeography, distribution and conservation status of maples (Acer L.) in Iran. Trees structure and Function , 31(3), 1–16.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00468-017-1571-1  Google Scholar

    19.

    Monfreda, R., Nuzzaci, G. & de Lillo, E. (2007) Detection, extraction, and collection of eriophyoid mites. Zootaxa , 1662, 35–43.  https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.1662.1.4  Google Scholar

    20.

    Nalepa, A. (1889) Beiträge zur Systematik der Phytopten. Sitzungsberichte der kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftliche Klasse, Wien., 98(1), 112–156 + 9 pls. Google Scholar

    21.

    Nalepa, A. (1891) Neue Gallmilben. Nova Acta Academiae Caesareae Leopoldino-Carolina Germanicae Naturae Curiosorum , 55(6), 363–395 + 4 pls. Google Scholar

    22.

    Ranjbar-Varandi, F., Haddad Irani-Nejad, K. & Lotfollahi, P. (2019) Six new provincial records and two new records of the superfamily Eriophyoidea (Acari: Trombidiformes) from Iran. Proceedings of the 3rd Iranian International congress of Entomology. August 17–19, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran, 133 pp. Google Scholar

    23.

    The World Flora Online (2022) World Flora Online. Available from  http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0000125895 (accessed 10 April 2022). Google Scholar

    24.

    Trotter, A. (1903) Miscellanee cecidologische. Marellia , 2, 29–35. Google Scholar

    25.

    Walter, D.E. & Krantz, G.W. (2009) Collecting, rearing, and preparing specimens. In : Krantz, G.W. & Walter, D.E. (Eds.), A Manual of Acarology , Third Edition . Lubbock Texas, USA, Texas Tech University Press, pp. 83–96. Google Scholar
    © Systematic & Applied Acarology Society
    Parisa Lotfollahi, Mojtaba Mohammad-Doustaresharaf, and Mohammad Bagheri "Eriophyoid mite species associated with Acer monspessulanum L. in Urmia region of Iran," Systematic and Applied Acarology 28(2), 309-321, (22 February 2023). https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.28.2.13
    Received: 9 December 2022; Accepted: 5 January 2023; Published: 22 February 2023
    KEYWORDS
    Acer
    Aceria
    Cecidophyes
    Eriophyoidea
    SAPINDACEAE
    West Azerbaijan
    Back to Top