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1 June 2011 Conspecific Egg Destruction by a Female Cerulean Warbler
Than J. Boves, David A. Buehler, N. Emily Boves
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Abstract

Conspecific egg destruction is an adaptive behavior that has typically evolved in multi-brooded, polygynous, or colonial avian species, and can be difficult to observe. We describe the first case of egg destruction in the Parulidae, which consists of mostly single-brooded and socially monogamous species. In this case, a female Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) destroyed 5-day old eggs at a conspecific's nest. This act was likely committed to secure a breeding opportunity with a high quality male or to decrease local competition for resources. There is also the possibility this behavior may have been pathological and not adaptive.

Than J. Boves, David A. Buehler, and N. Emily Boves "Conspecific Egg Destruction by a Female Cerulean Warbler," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 123(2), 401-403, (1 June 2011). https://doi.org/10.1676/10-151.1
Received: 15 September 2010; Accepted: 1 December 2010; Published: 1 June 2011
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