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1 June 2012 Stopover Site Fidelity by Tennessee Warblers at a Southern Appalachian High-elevation Site
David F. Vogt, Mark E. Hopey, G. Rad Mayfield, Eric C. Soehren, Laura M. Lewis, John A. Trent, Scott A. Rush
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Abstract

We examined stopover site fidelity by Tennessee Warblers (Oreothlypis peregrina) at two Tennessee banding stations (Whigg Meadow and Big Bald) operated during fall migration, ∼1,000 km from the nearest breeding areas. We captured and banded 4,324 Tennessee Warblers at Whigg Meadow from 1999 to 2008 with 14 individuals (0.3%) recaptured in subsequent years. We banded 5,514 Tennessee Warblers at Big Bald from 2003 to 2008 where, despite relatively close geographical proximity to Whigg Meadow (<150 km between sites), no individuals were recaptured outside of the initial capture year. These inter-annual recaptures, to our knowledge, reflect the highest reoccurrence of a Nearctic-neotropical migratory passerine at a single stopover site. Our results provide evidence that passerine stopover site fidelity may occur at considerable distances from both breeding and wintering areas, and differ between geographically similar stopover sites.

David F. Vogt, Mark E. Hopey, G. Rad Mayfield, Eric C. Soehren, Laura M. Lewis, John A. Trent, and Scott A. Rush "Stopover Site Fidelity by Tennessee Warblers at a Southern Appalachian High-elevation Site," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 124(2), 366-370, (1 June 2012). https://doi.org/10.1676/11-086.1
Received: 19 May 2011; Accepted: 1 November 2011; Published: 1 June 2012
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