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1 April 2007 Residue Management and Herbicides for Downy Brome (Bromus Tectorum) Control in Kentucky Bluegrass Grown for Seed
George W. Mueller-Warrant, William C. Young, Thomas G. Chastain, S. Caprice Rosato
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Abstract

Recent changes in herbicide registrations and governmental restrictions on field burning raised many management questions for Kentucky bluegrass seed producers, particularly the extent to which useful lives of their stands might be shortened by decreasing crop yields or increasing weed pressure. Tests conducted over the lives of two grass seed stands (1993–1997) evaluated three contrasting methods of postharvest residue management (vacuum sweep, bale/flail chop/rake, and field burn) and 13 herbicide treatments. Downy brome was the primary weed at both the Madras and LaGrande, OR, sites. In nontreated checks and the four least effective herbicide treatments, downy brome populations increased exponentially over time, with year-to-year increases in density averaging 13.1-fold. Competition had easily detected effects on Kentucky bluegrass seed yield at densities of 30 downy brome plants/m2, and crop stands were destroyed beyond 100 to 200 weeds/m2. Both PRE terbacil at 840 g/ha and early POST (EPOST)/late POST (LPOST) split-applied primisulfuron at 20 g/ha per application contained downy brome during the first 2 yr but not the third, when crop injury from terbacil forced reduction in terbacil rate and changes in weed populations overcame primisulfuron. PRE terbacil followed by LPOST primisulfuron, EPOST terbacil plus primisulfuron followed by LPOST primisulfuron, and EPOST/LPOST split-applied terbacil plus primisulfuron achieved excellent control of downy brome until the final years of the study, when control became increasingly erratic as primisulfuron-resistant downy brome proliferated in specific individual plots. Injury from combination terbacil plus primisulfuron treatments reduced yield relative to safest treatments in early years when downy brome population densities were low.

Nomenclature: Dicamba; metribuzin; oxyfluorfen; primisulfuron; terbacil; downy brome, Bromus tectorum L. BROTE; Kentucky bluegrass, Poa pratensis L. POAPR.

George W. Mueller-Warrant, William C. Young, Thomas G. Chastain, and S. Caprice Rosato "Residue Management and Herbicides for Downy Brome (Bromus Tectorum) Control in Kentucky Bluegrass Grown for Seed," Weed Technology 21(2), 411-420, (1 April 2007). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-04-240R1.1
Received: 17 August 2004; Accepted: 1 October 2006; Published: 1 April 2007
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