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1 October 2009 Problem Weed Control in Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean with Glyphosate Tank Mixes and Soil-Applied Herbicides
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Abstract

Although glyphosate controls many plant species, certain broadleaf weeds in Nebraska's cropping systems exhibit various levels of tolerance to the labeled rates of this herbicide, including ivyleaf morningglory, Venice mallow, yellow sweetclover, common lambsquarters, velvetleaf, kochia, Russian thistle, and field bindweed. Therefore, two field studies were conducted in 2004 and 2005 at Concord and North Platte, NE, to evaluate performance of (1) seven preemergence (PRE) herbicides and (2) glyphosate tank mixes applied postemergence (POST) at three application times for control of eight weed species that are perceived as problem weeds in glyphosate-resistant soybean in Nebraska. The PRE herbicides, including sulfentrazone plus chlorimuron, pendimethalin plus imazethapyr, imazaquin, and pendimethalin plus imazethapyr plus imazaquin provided more than 85% control of most weed species tested in this study 28 d after treatment (DAT). However, sulfentrazone plus chlorimuron and pendimethalin plus imazethapyr plus imazaquin were the only PRE treatments that provided more than 80% control of most weed species 60 DAT. In the POST glyphosate tank-mix study, the level of weed control was significantly affected by the timing of herbicide application; control generally decreased as weed height increased. In general, glyphosate tank mixes applied at the first two application times (early or mid-POST) with half label rates of lactofen, imazamox, imazethapyr, fomesafen, imazaquin, or acifluorfen, provided more than 80% control of all species that were 20 to 30 cm tall except ivyleaf morningglory, Venice mallow, yellow sweetclover, and field bindweed. Glyphosate tank mixes applied late POST with lactofen, imazethapyr, or imazaquin provided more than 70% control of common lambsquarters, velvetleaf, kochia, and Russian thistle that were 30 to 50 cm tall. Overall, glyphosate tank mixes with half label rates of chlorimuron or acifluorfen were the best treatments; they provided more than 80% control of all the studied weed species when applied at early growth stages. Results of this study suggested that mixing glyphosate with other POST broadleaf herbicides, or utilizing soil-applied herbicides after crop planting helped effectively control most problematic weeds in glyphosate-resistant soybean in Nebraska.

Nomenclature: Acifluorfen; chlorimuron; fomesafen; glyphosate; imazamox; imazaquin; imazethapyr; lactofen; pendimethalin; sulfentrazone; common lambsquarters, Chenopodium album L. CHEAL; field bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis L. CONAR; ivyleaf morningglory, Ipomoea hederacea Jacq. IPOHE; kochia, Kochia scoparia (L.) Schrad. KCHSC; Russian thistle, Salsola tragus L. SASKR; velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti Medik. ABUTH; Venice mallow, Hibiscus trionum L. HIBTR; yellow sweetclover, Melilotus officinalis (L.) Lam. MEUOF; soybean, Glycine max L.

Stevan Z. Knezevic, Avishek Datta, Jon Scott, Robert N. Klein, and Jeff Golus "Problem Weed Control in Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean with Glyphosate Tank Mixes and Soil-Applied Herbicides," Weed Technology 23(4), 507-512, (1 October 2009). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-09-012.1
Received: 30 January 2009; Accepted: 1 July 2009; Published: 1 October 2009
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