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1 January 2012 Response of Advanced Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Breeding Lines to Halosulfuron-Methyl
L. Brandenberger, N. Burgos, M. Payton, T. Morelock, D. Motes, S. Eaton, L. Martin, L. Carrier
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Abstract

Studies were conducted in Oklahoma and Arkansas to evaluate the tolerance of nine advanced cowpea breeding lines and one cultivar treated PRE with halosulfuron at 1× (0.054 kg ha−1) and 2× ( 0.107 kg ha−1) rates. The breeding lines, developed by the University of Arkansas, included 01-103, 01-111, 01-117, 01-140, 01-174, 01-180, 01-181, 01-184, and 01-198. ‘Early Scarlet’ was also included as the standard commercial cultivar. Halosulfuron did not reduce the emergence of the breeding lines and Early Scarlet in Oklahoma, but reduced cowpea emergence 14% at the 2× rate in Arkansas. All breeding lines and Early Scarlet had similar emergence capacity in both locations. Higher injury (crop stunting, up to 59% at the 2× rate) and reduction in flowering (up to 83% points at the 1× rate) were observed in Arkansas, but not in Oklahoma. Averaged over herbicide rate, yield was higher and did not differ among cultivars in Arkansas (0.89 to 1.18 Mg ha−1) versus Oklahoma (0.36 to 0.82 Mg ha−1). The highest yield in Oklahoma was obtained from 01-174, 01-103, and 01-117. Despite the observed phytotoxicity symptoms, halosulfuron did not reduce cowpea yield. Halosulfuron is safe to use with these breeding lines and cultivar, at the 0.054 kg ha−1 rate, but may delay cowpea maturity almost 1 wk in soils of close to neutral pH or higher.

Nomenclature: Halosulfuron-methyl; cowpea, Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.

Weed Science Society of America
L. Brandenberger, N. Burgos, M. Payton, T. Morelock, D. Motes, S. Eaton, L. Martin, and L. Carrier "Response of Advanced Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Breeding Lines to Halosulfuron-Methyl," Weed Technology 26(1), 43-47, (1 January 2012). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-D-10-00170.1
Received: 20 December 2010; Accepted: 1 August 2011; Published: 1 January 2012
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